Bonus content! The do-it-yourself divorce process

Bonus content! The do-it-yourself divorce process

This video tells you how to get divorced in British Columbia without having to hire a lawyer or see a judge in court. It provides a step-by-step description of the do-it-yourself divorce process when you’re doing it on your own and when you’re doing it with your ex. Watch this video along with Ep. 03 The Basics: Divorce and Ep. 17 Ending Relationships: Getting Divorced.

There are two parts that can be a bit tricky in the D.I.Y. divorce process, getting an affidavit of service in the sole divorce process, and filing your marriage certificate with your notice of claim. I’ve made a video that’s all about affidavits of service, so let’s talk about marriage certificates.

First, you need to know that the marriage certificate you need is the ugly thing issued by the government where you were married, not the flowery thing your marriage commissioner gave you. The court has a binder with examples of marriage certificates from across the world. They’ll know what the right certificate looks like, so don’t think that because you got married in Camaroon or Liechtenstein you can just whip something up with a colour printer.)

Second, the certificate needs to be the original certificate or an official copy of the certificate. (The government department that handles these things — in BC it’s the Vital Statistics Agency — will have a way for you to order your marriage certificate. For a fee, of course.)

Third, the certificate needs to either be in English or be accompanied by a translation. Even if the certificate is in French — one of Canada’s two official languages! — it still needs a translation. The translation must be provided in the form of an affidavit made by the translator, and the translator must explain their qualifications in the affidavit.

1 Comment

  1. There are two parts that can be a bit tricky in the D.I.Y. divorce process, getting an affidavit of service in the sole divorce process, and filing your marriage certificate with your notice of claim. I’ve made a video that’s all about affidavits of service, so let’s talk about marriage certificates.

    First, you need to know that the marriage certificate you need is the ugly thing issued by the government where you were married, not the flowery thing your marriage commissioner gave you. The court has a binder with examples of marriage certificates from across the world. They’ll know what the right certificate looks like, so don’t think that because you got married in Camaroon or Liechtenstein you can just whip something up with a colour printer.)

    Second, the certificate needs to be the original certificate or an official copy of the certificate. (The government department that handles these things — in BC it’s the Vital Statistics Agency — will have a way for you to order your marriage certificate. For a fee, of course.)

    Third, the certificate needs to either be in English or be accompanied by a translation. Even if the certificate is in French — one of Canada’s two official languages! — it still needs a translation. The translation must be provided in the form of an affidavit made by the translator, and the translator must explain their qualifications in the affidavit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*